The State of North Carolina Adopts Energy Rating Index Option to Their Building Energy Code

August 21st, 2018 - Posted by emma@resnet.us under RESNET News

The State of North Carolina has joined the ranks of states and municipalities that have adopted the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Energy Rating Index (ERI) option.
The new state energy code includes the ERI compliance option. The option sets scores thresholds that the home’s energy rating must meet. In addition, the option requires that minimum envelope requirements and other mandatory measures are met.
The RESNET HERS Index is the most common of demonstration compliance method to the IECC ERI.
The Energy Rating Index option of the new North Carolina code is based on the 2015 International Energy Conservation as modified by the State.
The State of North Carolina modified the ERI score thresholds. The new code has two thresholds depending on the presence of on-site power. The State also set two time frames for the threshold scores.
Maximum Energy Rating Index Scores Without On-Site Renewable Energy
 
Climate Zone
January 1, 2019 – December 31, 2020
January 1, 2021 Forward
3
65
61
4
67
63
5
67
63
Maximum Energy Rating Index Scores With On-Site Renewable Energy
 
Climate Zone
January 1, 2019 – December 31, 2020
January 1, 2021 Forward
3
51
47
4
54
50
5
54
50
Other North Carolina ERI modifications are:
  • The calculation of Energy Rating Index Scores are based on the RESNET/ICC Standard 301.
  • The mandatory measures are based on the 2012 North Carolina Energy Conservation Code and not the 2019 IECC.
  • Defines a HERS Rater as “An individual that has completed training and been certified by RESNET (Residential Energy Services Network) Accredited Rating Provider and has a current certification.”
North Carolina builders must meet the provisions of the new energy code on January 1, 2019. To download the new North Carolina energy code go to 2018 North Carolina Energy Conservation Code.
The inclusion of the Energy Rating Index was championed by a coalition of advocacy organizations and home builders.
“I think this is a win-win for code officials and builders,” said Ryan Johnson, President of Revolution Homes, a custom home builder based in Raleigh. “As homes become more complicated, the HERS Index and rating companies become more valuable. Because their established standards are already integrated into our construction systems and processes, transitioning to the next energy code will be easier and more cost effective for us,” said Johnson.
The North Carolina Building Performance Association (NCBPA) was one of several energy efficiency advocates to champion members of the Energy Ad Hoc Committee and the NC Building Code Council (NCBCC) to include the ERI option in the new code. Since its approval, NCBPA has worked with the NC Department of Insurance (NCDOI) to develop the policies and procedures that builders, code officials and rating companies will use to complete ERI verification.
“The ERI provides an easy, expedited and cost-effective performance-based compliance path that further adds to the many benefits of HERS ratings,” said Ryan Miller, NCBPA’s Executive Director. “Builders will save time and money, code officials will spend less time on the job and consumers will benefit from the third-party energy efficiency verification process,” said Miller.
In 2017, there were 15,545 homes HERS rated in North Carolina. The average HERS Index Scores of homes rated in the state in 2017 was 67.
There are a total of fifteen states that now have adopted the ERI option as a compliance option to their state energy code. The states that have incorporated the ERI into their energy code are:
  • Alabama
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Illinois
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Nevada
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Pennsylvania
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
RESNET and the International Code Council (ICC) have produced a video production explaining how HERS can be used to demonstrated compliance to an energy code. To view the video, go to HERS Index and Energy Codes.
RESNET has also produced an infographic explaining the ERI. To download the infographic, go to What is the ERI?

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