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Mortgage Industry National Home Energy Rating Standards

The RESNET HERS ratings are now based on Standards ANSI/RESNET/ICC 301 and ANSI/RESNET/ICC 380 and their ANSI approved Addenda together with other requirements of Chapter 3. The editions of the Standards and all the Addenda are listed in Chapter 3, Section 304 Normative References. All listed Addenda are currently in force, Effective, but a Transition Period ending July 1, 2019 has been authorized for Standard ANSI/RESNET/ICC 301 Addenda F, L and N. See the heading on the first page of each Addendum for the Effective Date and for the Transition Period End Date where a Transition Period has been authorized.

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Historical Information 

The following are the amendments to the National Home Energy Rating Standards that were adopted by RESNET in 2016. The key to the success of the rating industry is to setting and implementing the standards for quality of rating services. Having technically sound and up-to-date standards enhances the credibility of the entire rating industry.

The amendments adopted are:

The following are the amendments to the National Home Energy Rating Standards that were adopted by RESNET in 2015. The key to the success of the rating industry is to setting and implementing the standards for quality of rating services. Having technically sound and up-to-date standards enhances the credibility of the entire rating industry.

The amendments adopted are:

The following are the amendments to the National Home Energy Rating Standards that were adopted by RESNET in 2013. The key to the success of the rating industry is to setting and implementing the standards for quality of rating services. Having technically sound and up-to-date standards enhances the credibility of the entire rating industry.

The amendments adopted are:

The following are the amendments of the National Home Energy Rating Standards adopted by RESNET in 2012. The key to the success of the rating industry is to setting and implementing the standards for quality of rating services. Having technically sound and up-to-date standards enhances the credibility of the entire rating industry.

The amendments adopted are:

The following are the amendments of the National Home Energy Rating Standards adopted by RESNET in 2011. The key to the success of the rating industry is to setting and implementing the standards for quality of rating services. Having technically sound and up-to-date standards enhances the credibility of the entire rating industry.

The amendments adopted are:

The following are the amendments of the National Home Energy Rating Standards adopted by RESNET in 2010. The key to the success of the rating industry is to setting and implementing the standards for quality of rating services. Having technically sound and up-to-date standards enhances the credibility of the entire rating industry.

The amendments adopted are:

The following are the amendments of the National Home Energy Rating Standards adopted by RESNET in 2009. The key to the success of the rating industry is to setting and implementing the standards for quality of rating services. Having technically sound and up-to-date standards enhances the credibility of the entire rating industry.

The amendments adopted are:

The following are the amendments of the National Home Energy Rating Standards adopted by RESNET in 2008. The key to the success of the rating industry is to setting and implementing the standards for quality of rating services. Having technically sound and up-to-date standards enhances the credibility of the entire rating industry.

The amendments adopted are:

The following are the amendments of the National Home Energy Rating Standards adopted by RESNET in 2007. The key to the success of the rating industry is to setting and implementing the standards for quality of rating services. Having technically sound and up-to-date standards enhances the credibility of the entire rating industry.

The amendments adopted are:

The following are the amendments of the National Home Energy Rating Standards adopted by RESNET in 2006. key to the success of the rating industry is to setting and implementing the standards for quality of rating services. Having technically sound and up-to-date standards enhances the credibility of the entire rating industry.

The amendments being proposed are:

The key to the success of the rating industry is to setting and implementing the standards for quality of rating services. Having technically sound and up-to-date standards enhances the credibility of the entire rating industry and provides greater confidence in the rating services.

In 2004 RESNET adopted a set of comprehensive enhancements to its rating standards. Since the enhancements were adopted a number of changes have taken place that effect building performance. These changes includes the new proposed 2006 ENERGY STAR for Homes guidelines and passage by Congress of tax credits for residential energy efficiency. In addition it was discovered that there was a need to tweak some of the provisions of the enhancements. For this reason a set of amendments are being proposed to the national home energy rating standards.

There are two main categories of amendments that were adopted: enhancements to the technical guidelines and a modification to the rating quality assurance provisions. The most significant change is changing the current rating score to a “HERS® Index” where a score of “0” equates to a net zero energy home and a score of “100” equates to the HERS reference home.

2005 Adopted Amendments

The RESNET Standards Drafting Committee was appointed in 2001 with the approval of the RESNET Board of Directors to review RESNET’s Mortgage Industry National Home Energy Rating Standards and draft proposed amendments to the standard. After three years of research, deliberations, vetting and public review, the committee developed a set of enhancements to the national rating standard developed by the committee.

The enhancements were endorsed by the RESNET Board of Directors and adopted by the Standards Revisions Committee on December 23, 2004. The Revisions Committee is composed of three representatives of State Energy Offices and three representatives of the rating industry.

The adopted enhancements to the national home energy rating standards were developed through a three-year process included:

  • Publicly soliciting recommendations for proposed changes to the standard in 2001
  • A consensus process in which the drafting committee reviewed and developed the proposed amendments
  • An aggressive vetting and robust education effort to obtain input from the key stakeholders of rating services.
  • The education effort included presentations to the National Association of Home Builders Energy Subcommittee, RESNET Conference, EEBA Conference, and Affordable Comfort Conference and numerous articles in RESNET Notes, Home Energy Magazine, and Energy Design Update.
  • An industry education effort took place after the amendments were drafted and before the public comment process. The proposed amendments and their justifications were posted on the RESNET web site 30 days prior to the public comment process. A major emphasis of the 2004 RESNET Conference was to educate the industry on the proposed amendments. Break-out sessions were dedicated to the proposed amendments that would have the greatest impact on the rating industry and a half day general session was dedicated to a forum on the proposed amendments. In the general session, every proposed amendment was presented and conference participants were allowed to express their views.
  • A 75 day public comment period followed the education effort. The comment period was extended by 15 days upon the request of the National Association of Home Builders.
  • A seven month review period followed, where the drafting committee carefully reviewed every comment received and made necessary changes to the amendments based upon the comments. This effort included consultation with key experts such as Gary Nelson of the Energy Conservatory, Hank Rutkowski with ACCA, and interest groups such as the North American Insulation Manufacturers Association.

The result of this process is a set of enhancements to the national home energy rating standards that solve many known issues with the existing standard, are technically defendable, and do not present an undue burden on the rating industry or the clients of its services. The result enhances the credibility of our industry by moving the industry into the 21st century and setting high standards of quality.

To review the 2004 enhancements to the national home energy rating standards click on Adopted Enhancements to the Mortgage Industry National Home Energy Rating Standards.